Glaucoma

What Is It And How Can It Be Treated
Glaucoma is a condition that causes damage to your eye’s optic nerve and gets worse over time

WHAT IS GLAUCOMA?

Glaucoma is a complicated disease in which damage to the optic nerve results in vision loss. There are several forms of glaucoma; the two most common forms are primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and angle-closure glaucoma (ACG)

WHO IS AT RISK FROM GLAUCOMA?

Everyone is at risk for glaucoma. However, certain groups are at higher risk than others. People at high risk for glaucoma should get a complete eye exam, including eye dilation, every one or two years.

HOW DOES GLAUCOMA AFFECT MY VISION?

The increased pressure, called intraocular pressure, can damage the optic nerve, which transmits images to your brain. If the damage continues, glaucoma can lead to permanent vision loss. Without treatment, glaucoma can cause total permanent blindness within a few years.

THE IMPACT OF GLAUCOMA

This short video explains how glaucoma can affect your eyes and the impact it can have on your lifestyle.

TREATING GLAUCOMA

Glaucoma can be treated with eye drops, pills, laser surgery, traditional surgery or a combination of these methods. The goal of any treatment is to prevent loss of vision, as vision loss from glaucoma is irreversible.

EYE DROPS & PILLS

After consultation you may be prescribed eye drops in order to control your eye pressure. When eye drops dont sufficiently control the pressure you may also be prescribed pills in addition to the drops.

LASER EYE SURGERY

When medication does not achieve the desired results, or have intolerable side effects, your ophthalmologist may suggest surgery. There are many different types of laser eye surgery available depending on the severity of the condition.

TRADITIONAL SURGERY

When medications and laser therapies do not adequately lower eye pressure, your doctor may recommend conventional surgery. The most common of these operations is called a trabeculectomy, which is used in both open-angle and closed-angle glaucomas.

Contact Your Local Practice for More Information